01182018Headline:

Keys

All-section key blank
the key section which enters all keyways of a multiplex key system.
Angularly bitted key
a key which has perpendicular cuts made into the blade at various degrees of rotation.
Associated change key
a change key which is directly related to particular master key through the use of constant cuts.
Associated master key
a master key which has particular change keys related directly to its combination through the use of constant cuts.
Attendant's key
a selective master key used in a hospital keying system.
Bell type key
a key whose cuts are in the form of wavy grooves milled into the flat sides of the key blade. The grooves usually run the entire length of the blade.
Binary cut key
a key whose combination only allows for two possibilities in each bitting position: cut or no cut.
Bit
the part of the key which serves as the blade, usually for use in a warded or lever tumbler lock. May also mean to cut a key.
Bit key
a key with one or more projecting bits.
Bitting
the numbers which represent the dimensions of the key cuts. 2. the actual cut(s) or combination of a key
Bitting depth
the length of a cut that is made into the blade of a key.
Bitting list
a listing of all the key combinations used within a system. The combinations are usually arranged in order of the blind code, direct code, and/or key symbol.
Bitting position
the location of a key cut.
Blade
the portion of a key which may contain the cuts and/or milling.
Blank
an uncut key.
Block master key
the one pin master key for all combinations listed as a block in the standard progression format.
Bottom of blade
the portion of the blade opposite the cut edge of a single bitted key.
Bow
the portion of the key which serves as a grip or handle.
Bow stop
a type of stop located near the key bow.
Bypass key
the key which operates a key override cylinder.
Change key
a key which operates only one cylinder or one group of keyed alike cylinders in a keying system.
Changeable bit key
a key which can be recombinated by exchanging and/or rearranging portions of its bit or blade.
CK
change key or control key.
Clipper
a hand held key bitting punch, often incorporating a trigger-like handle.
Code key
a key cut to a specific code rather than duplicated from a pattern key. It may or may not conform to the lock manufacturer's specifications.
Code original key
a code key which conforms to the lock manufacturer's specifications.
Compound bitted key
a key with at least one compound cut.
Compound cut
a bitting which has another bitting dimension within its dimensions.
Constant cut
Any bittings that are identical in corresponding positions from one key to another in a keying system. They usually group these keys together within a given level of keying, and/or link them with keys of other levels.
Construction breakout key
a key used by some manufacturers to render all construction master keys permanently inoperative.
Construction master key
a key normally used by construction personnel for a temporary period during building construction. It may be rendered permanently inoperative without disassembling the cylinder.
Construction master keyed
of or pertaining to a cylinder which is or is to be operated temporarily by a construction master key.
Control cut
any bitting which operates the retaining device of an interchangeable or removable core.
Control key
a key whose only purpose is to remove and/or install an interchangeable or removable core. A bypass key used to operate and/or reset some combination type locks. Also a key which allows disassembly of some removable cylinder locks.
Controlled cross keying
a condition in which two or more different keys of the same level of keying and under the same higher level keys operate one cylinder by design; e.g., XAAI operated by AA2 (but not XAAl operated by Al:H) NOTE: This condition could severely limit the security of the cylinder and the maximum expansion of the system when more than a few of these different keys operate a cylinder, or more than a few cross keyed cylinders per system are required.
Cut angle
a measurement usually expressed in degrees for the angle between the two sides of a key cut.
Display key
a special change key in a hotel master key system which will allow access to one designated guest room, even if the lock is in the shut out mode. It may also act as a shut out key for that room.
Dogging key
a key or tool used to dog an exit device.
Double bitted key
a key bitted on two opposite surfaces.
Drilled key
a type of bit key with a hole drilled into the shank from the tip.
Duplicate
to copy.
Duplicate key
any key reproduced from a pattern key.
Effective plug diameter
the dimension obtained by adding the root depth of a key cut to the length of its corresponding bottom pin which establishes a perfect shear line. Won't necessarily be the same as the actual plug diameter.
Emergency key
the key which operates a privacy function lockset.
Emergency master key
a special master key which usually operates all guest room locks in a hotel master key system at all times, even in the shut out mode. This key may also act as a shut out key.
End ward cut
any cut made into a key to bypass an end ward.
Engineer's key
a selective master key which is used by maintenance personnel to operate many locks under different master keys in a system of three or more levels of keying.
Factory original key
the cut key furnished by the lock manufacturer for a lock or cylinder.
Fireman's key
a key used to override normal operation of elevators, bringing them to the ground floor.
First generation duplicate
a key which was duplicated using a factory original key or a code original key as a pattern.
First key
any key produced without the use of a pattern key.
Five column progression
a process wherein key bittings are obtained by using the cut possibilities in five columns of the key bitting array.
Five pin master key
a master key for all combinations obtained by progressing five bitting positions.
Flat type key
a key which is completely flat on both sides, usually used for warded or lever tumbler locks.
Floor master key
a master key which operates all or most master keyed locks on a particular floor of a building.
Four column progression
a process wherein key bittings are obtained by using the cut possibilities in four columns of the key bitting array.
Four pin master key
a master key for all combinations obtained by progressing four bitting positions.
Grand master key
the key which operates two or more separate groups of locks, which are each operated by a different master key.
Grand master key system
a master key system which has exactly three levels of keying.
Grand master keyed
of or pertaining to a lock or cylinder which is or is to be keyed into a grand master key system.
Great grand master key
the key which operates two or more separate groups of locks which are each operated by a different grand master key.
Great grand master key system
a master key system which has exactly four levels of keying.
Great grand master keyed
of or pertaining to a lock or cylinder which is or is to be keyed into a great grand master key system.
Great great grand master key
the key which operates two or more separate groups of locks which are each operated by different great grand master keys.
Great great grand master key system
a master key system which has five or more levels of keying.
Great great grand master keyed
of or pertaining to a lock or cylinder which is or is to be keyed into a great great grand master key system.
Guard key
a key which must be used in conjunction with a renter's key to unlock a safe deposit lock. It is usually the same for every lock within an installation.
Guest key
a key in a hotel master key system which is normally used to unlock only the one guest room for which it was intended, but will not operate the lock in the shut out mode.
Guide
part of a key machine which follows the cuts of a pattern key or template during duplication. Or part of a flat key lever lock which connects the nose to the foot and supports the key blade.
High security key
a key for a high security cylinder.
Horizontal group master key
the two pin master key for all combinations listed in all blocks in a line across the page in the standard progression format.
Housekeeper's key
a selective master key in a hotel master key system which may operate all guest and linen rooms and other housekeeping areas.
Incidental master key
a key cut to an unplanned shearline created when the cylinder is combinated to the top master key and a change key.
Individual key
an operating key for a lock or cylinder which is not part of a keying system.
Key
a properly combinated device which is, or most closely resembles, the device specifically intended by the lock manufacturer to operate the corresponding lock.
Key bitting array
a matrix (graphic) display of all possible bittings for change keys and master keys as related to the top master key.
Key bitting punch
a manually operated device which stamps or punches the cuts into the key blade, rather than grinding or milling them.
Key bitting specifications
the technical data required to bit a given (family of) key blanks to the lock manufacturer's dimensions.
Key blank
any material manufactured to the proper size and configuration which allows its entry into the keyway or a specific locking device. A key blank has not yet been combinated or cut.
Key changeable
of or pertaining to a lock or cylinder which can be recombinated without disassembly, by the use of a key. The use of a tool may also be required.
Key coding machine
a key machine designed for the production of code keys. It may or may not also serve as a duplicating machine.
Key control
any method or procedure which limits unauthorized acquisition of a key and/or controls distribution of authorized keys. A systematic organization of keys and key records.
Key cut profile
the shape of a key cut, including the cut angle and the cut root shape.
Key cuts
the portion of the key blade which remains after being cut and which aligns the tumblers.
Key duplicating machine
a key machine which is designed to make copies from a pattern key.
Key gauge
a usually flat device with a cutaway portion indexed with a given set of depth or spacing specifications. It is used to help determine the combination of a key.
Key milling
the grooves machined in to the length of the key blade to allow its entry into the keyway.
Key override
a provision allowing interruption or circumvention of normal operation of a combination lock or electrical device. Of or pertaining to such a provision, as in "key override cylinder" key.
Key pull position
any position of the cylinder plug at which the key can be removed.
Key pulls
a lock specification which indicates by quantity and orientation the positions in which a key may be withdrawn.
Key records
records which typically include some or all of the following: bitting list, key bitting array, key system schematic, end user, number of keys/cylinders issued, names of persons to whom keys were issued, hardware/keying schedule.
Key Records Department
the department which is responsible for generating and issuing all lock and key combinations and maintaining records of them.
Key section
the exact cross sectional configuration of a key blade as viewed from the bow toward the tip.
Key switch
a switch operated by a keyed lock mechanism which may be an integral part of the switch assembly.
Key symbol
a designation used for a key combination in the standard key coding system, e.g. A, AA, AAI, etc.
Key system schematic
a drawing with blocks utilizing keying symbols, usually illustrating the hierarchy of all keys within a master key system. It indicates the structure and total expansion of the system.
Keyed
combinated or having provision for operation by key.
Keyed alike
of or pertaining to two or more locks or cylinders, each of which is or is to be combinated differently from the others. They may or may not be part of a keying system.
Keyed different
of or pertaining to a group of locks or cylinders, each of which is or is to be combinated differently from the others. They may or may nor be part of a locking system.
Keyed random
of or pertaining to a cylinder or group of cylinders selected from a limited inventory of different key changes. Duplicate billings may occur.
Keying conference
a meeting of the end user and the key system supplier at which the keying and levels of keying, including future expansion, are determined and specified.
Keying symbol
a designation used for a lock or cylinder combination in the standard key coding system; e.g., AAI, XAAl, XIX, etc.
Knock-out tag
the portion of a key bow where a code number may be stamped and which is designed to be removed from the bow prior to normal usage.
Lockout key
a key made in two pieces. One piece is trapped in the keyway by the tumblers when inserted and blocks entry of any regular key. The second piece is used to remove the first piece.
Maid's master key
the master key in a hotel master key system given to the maid. It operates only cylinders of the guest rooms and linen closets in the maid's designated area.
Maison key system
[from the French meaning "house'' key system] a keying system in which one or more cylinders are operated by every key (or relatively large numbers of different keys) in the system; e.g., main entrances of apartment buildings operated by all individual suite keys of the building.
Manipulation key
any key other than a correct key which can be variably positioned and/or manipulated in a keyway to operate a lock or cylinder.
Master key
a key which operates all the master keyed locks or cylinders in a group, each lock or cylinder usually operated by its own change key. To combinate a group of locks or cylinders such that each is operated by its own change key as well as by a master key for the entire group.
Master key changes
the number of different usable change keys available under a given master key.
Master key system
any keying arrangement which has two or more levels of keying. A keying arrangement which has exactly two levels of keying.
Master keyed
of or pertaining to a cylinder or group of cylinders which are or are to be combinated so that all may be operated by their own change keys and by additional keys known as master keys.
Master keyed only
of or pertaining to a lock or cylinder which is or is to be combinated only to a master key.
Maximum adjacent cut specification
the maximum allowable difference between adjacent cut depths.
Maximum opposing cut specification
the maximum allow depths to which opposing cuts can be mack without breaking through the key blade. This is typically a consideration with dimple keys.
Mis-cut
of or pertaining to a key which has been cut incorrectly. A mis-cut key.
Multi-section key blank
a key section which enters more than one, but not all keyways in a multiplex key system.
Multiple gating
a means of master keying by providing a tumbler with more than one gate.
Multiplex key blank
any key blank which is part of a multiplex key system.
Multiplex key system
a series of different key sections which may be used to expand a master key system by repeating bittings on additional key sections. The keys of one key section will not enter the keyway of another key section. This type of system always includes another key section which will enter more than one, or all of the keyways. A keying system which uses such keyways and key sections.
Neck (of a key)
the portion of a bit key between the shoulder and the bits. The portion of a cylinder key between the shoulder and the bow.
Non-original key
any key blank other than an original key blank.
Non-removable key
a key which has one or more cuts on it which trap the key in the lock upon insertion.
Nurse's key
a selective master key used in a hospital keying system.
One pin master key
a master key for all combinations obtained by progressing only one bitting position.
Operating key
any key which will properly operate a lock or cylinder to lock or unlock the lock mechanism and is not a control key or reset key.
Original key blank
a key blank supplied by the lock manufacturer to fit that manufacturer's specific produce.
Page master key
the three pin master key for all combinations listed on a page in the standard progression format.
Pattern key
an original key kept on file to use in a key duplicating machine when additional keys are required. Any key which is used in a key duplicating machine to create a duplicate key.
Post (of a key)
the portion of a bit key between the tip and the shoulder, to which the bits are attached.
Prep key
a type of guard key for a safe deposit box lock with only one keyway. It must be turned once and withdrawn before the renter's key will unlock the unit.
Primary key
a key which operates the ignition lock on a vehicle. It may or may not also operate some or all the other locks on a vehicle.
Privacy key
a key which operates an SKD cylinder.
Progression list
a bitting list of change keys and master keys arranged in sequence of progression.
Radiused blade bottom
the bottom of a key blade which has been radiused to conform to the curvature of the cylinder plug it is designed to enter.
Random master keying
any undesirable process used to master key which uses unrelated keys to create a system.
Read key
a key which allows access to the sales and/or customer data on certain types of cash control equipment (e.g., cash registers).
Recore
to rekey by installing a different core.
Register groove
the reference point on the key blade from which some manufacturers locate the bitting depths.
Register number
a reference number, typically associated by the lock manufacturer to an entire master key system. A blind code assigned by some lock manufacturers to higher level keys in a master key system.
Removal key
the part of a two-piece key which is used to remove its counterpart from a keyway.
Renter's key
a key which must be used together with a guard key, prep key or electronic release to unlock a safe deposit lock. It is usually different for every unit within an installation.
Reset key
a key used to set some types of cylinders to a new combination. Many of these cylinders require the additional use of tools and/or the new operating key to establish the new combination. A key which allows the tabulations on various types of cash control equipment (e.g., cash registers) to be cleared from the records of the equipment.
Reversible key
a symmetrical key which may be inserted either way up to operate a lock.
Ring key
a key attached to a ring to be worn on the finger.
Root depth
the dimension from the bottom of a cut on a key to the bottom of the blade.
Rotating constant
one or more cuts in a key of any level which remain constant throughout all levels and are identical to the top master key cuts in their corresponding positions. The positions where the top master key cuts are held constant may be moved, always in a logical sequence.
Rotating constant method
a method used to progress key bittings in a master key system, wherein at least one cut in each key is identical to the corresponding cut in the top master key. The identical cuts are moved to different locations in a logical sequence until each possible planned position has been used.
Row master key
the one pin master key for all combinations listed on the same line across a page in the standard progression format.
Second generation duplicate
a key reproduced from a first generation duplicate.
Secondary key
a key which operates certain locks on a vehicle, but not the ignition lock.
Selective key system
key system in which every key has the capability of being a master key. It is normally used for applications requiring a limited number of keys and extensive cross keying.
Selective master key
an unassociated master key which can be made to operate any specific lock in the entire system in addition to the regular master keys and/or change keys for the cylinder without creating key interchange.
Sequence of progression
the order in which bitting positions are progressed to obtain change key combinations.
Set-up key
a key used to calibrate some types of key machines.
Seven column progression
a process wherein key bittings are obtained by using the cut possibilities in seven columns of the key bitting array.
Seven pin master key
a master key for all combinations obtained by progressing seven bitting positions.
Shank
the part of a bit key between the bow and the stop or if there is no shoulder stop, the part between the bow and the near side of the bit.
Shut out key
usually used in hotel keying systems, a key which will make the lock inoperative to all other keys in the system except the emergency master key, display key, and some types of shut out keys.
Side ward cut
a cut made into a key to bypass a side ward.
Single key section
an individual key section which can be used in a multiplex key system.
Single step progression
a progression using a one increment difference between bittings of a given position.
Six column progression
a process wherein key bittings are obtained by using the cut possibilities in six columns of the key bitting array.
Six pin master key
a master key for all combinations obtained by progressing six bitting positions.
Skeleton key
any non-cylinder key whose bit, blade, and/or post is cut away enough to allow it to enter and turn in locks with different ward arrangements.
Spacing
the dimensions from the stop to the center of the first cut and/or to the centers or successive cuts.
Split pin master keying
a method of master keying a pin tumbler cylinder by installing master pins into one or more pin chambers.
Standard key coding system
an industry standard and uniform method of designating all keys and/or cylinders in a master key system. The designation automatically indicates the exact function and keying level of each key and/or cylinder in the system, usually without further explanation.
Standard progression format
a systematic method of listing and relating all change key combinations to all master key combinations in a master key system. The listing is divided into segments known as blocks, horizontal groups, vertical groups, rows, and pages for levels of control.
Stop (of a key)
the part of a key from which all cuts are indexed and which determines how far the key enters the keyway.
Sub-master key
the master key level immediately below the master key in a system of six or more levels of keying.
Three column progression
a process wherein key bittings are obtained by using cut possibilities in three columns of the key bitting array.
Three pin master key
a master key for all combinations obtained by progressing three bitting positions.
Throat cut
the cut made into a key to bypass a throat ward.
Tip
the portion of the key which enters the keyway first.
Tip stop
a type of stop located at or near the tip of the key.
Top master key
the highest level master key in a master key system.
Top of blade
the bitted edge of a single bitted key.
Total position progression
a process used to obtain key bittings in a master key system wherein bittings of change keys differ from those of the top master key in all bitting positions.
Try-out key
a manipulation key which is usually part of a set, used for a specific series, keyway, and/or brand of lock.
Tubular key
a key with a tubular blade. The key cuts are made into the end of the blade, around its circumference.
Two column progression
a process wherein key bittings are obtained by using the cut possibilities in two columns of the key bitting array.
Two pin master key
a master key for all combinations obtained by progressing two bitting positions.
Unassociated change key
a change key which is not directly related to a particular master key through the use of certain constant cuts.
Uncombinated
of or pertaining to a cylinder which is or is to be supplied without keys, tumblers and springs. Of or pertaining to a lock, cylinder or key in which the combination has not been set.
Uncontrolled cross keying
a condition in which two or more different keys under different higher level keys operate one cylinder by design; e.g., XAAI operated by AB, ABI. NOTE: This condition severely limits the security of the cylinder and the maximum expansion of the system, and often leads to key interchange.
Vertical group master key
the two pin master key for all combinations listed in all blocks in a line down a page in the standard progression format.
Visual key control
a specification that all keys and the visible portion of the front of all lock cylinders are stamped with standard keying symbols.